NYC Streets on Paper

As is usually the case with development projects, pen must be put to paper first followed by a series of reviews and sign-offs before a shovel is put to the ground. That is also the case with street construction. What is unique, however, is that a street must be added to a map before it is constructed.

In New York City, a newly proposed street must be added to the official ‘City Map’ (not to be confused with NYCityMap) through the Uniformed Land Use Review Procedure (ULURP) before it can be constructed. Thus a street will exist on paper before it becomes a reality. These streets are what have become to be known as paper streets. Paper streets are not unique to NYC but ULURP is.

Paper streets may exist on paper only for many years before they are ever constructed. The street’s configuration or name may change before construction takes place. There are even situations whereby a street could halted (de-mapped) – see definition below – before it ever becomes a reality.

The dashed lines on the map below represent paper streets in the Midland Beach section of Staten Island. It is clear from the area that these infill streets are intended to complete the planned street grid when fully built out. However there could be circumstances (e.g., being in a flood zone) that prevent the streets from being constructed.

Paper Streets: Midland Beach, Staten Island

Paper Streets: Midland Beach, Staten Island

Although originally on paper only, paper streets can be found in NYC digital data. The NYC Street Centerline (CSCL) data set on the NYC Open Data Portal and City Planning’s LION data set include paper streets. For those wondering, LION is an extract of CSCL that includes both single-line (generic) and dual-line (roadbed) representation of the street network plus additional geographies. Additionally, LION has more fine-grained segmentation (breaks occur whenever geographies cross or there are unique address range breaks). Whereas, CSCL is focused specifically on the actual street (roadbed) representation with segmentation by block. More on these data sets in a later dedicated post.

Paper streets can be found as follows:
LION – featuretyp values of 5 and 9;
CSCL – STATUS values 3 and 9.

The inverse of a paper street is a de-mapped street. As the name would apply, this is a case where a street was officially removed from the City Map. And as with paper streets, the street will appear on paper (City Map) as being de-mapped before they are actually removed.

De-mapped Street

De-mapped Street: Melrose Crescent, Bronx

De-mapped streets can be found in LION where status equals 5.